To The Editor,

In recent weeks, we have had the March for Science and the People’s Climate March. I must confess I am no climate scientist. However, in my profession as a behavior specialist, I do understand the importance of data that is measurable and replicable.

I am suspicious of the number given that 97% of scientists believe climate change is primarily caused by human activity. I also do not believe that the debate is over. No scientific debate should ever be over as ongoing research often brings new facts. With that said, however, I do not think it is possible to refute that the overwhelming consensus in the scientific community is climate change, largely human caused, is a real danger. One we can do something about but only if we act.

It is human nature to see what is immediate as the mover of our decisions. Self-interest and short-term gains often hide more distant long-term consequences. However, such long-term consequences are what define the legacy and reputation of those who are empowered to make important decisions.

It is therefore incumbent upon all of us, whether we voted for Mr. Trump or did not, to implore him to seek out the best decision making process possible in regards to decisions regarding climate change and adherence to the Paris Climate Agreement.

If an overwhelming majority in the scientific community maintains human caused climate change is real and a significant danger, and that consensus is accurate, we should remember this. Those who deny and ignore what an overwhelming majority in the best position to know warned about will never be forgiven, as increasingly over time many will suffer for such short sightedness. Their name will symbolize arrogance, narrow-minded self-interest, expedience, and ignorance. That will be their lasting legacy.

Carey Jaffee