To the Editor:

As I look at our changing culture, much of it good, I cannot help to point out one toxic component that creates too much vitriol and dislike, the unwillingness of many to agree to disagree.

I am not here to debate which candidate, local or national, is right or wrong on the issues but more importantly I am here to ask all of us to put aside our differences and understand that just because your neighbor is voting for a candidate you find unfit for the position doesn’t justify any acts other than trying to understand that good people can have varying opinions.

While the current elections seem to have accelerated this rush to judgement by many this pattern is not new. As many of you know I wrote a column for the Press for a number of years and published a tell-all book on healthcare. A few physicians, because of my views on health care, having never met or spoken to me, made it known that they not only disliked me because of my opinions but also if given the opportunity would even refuse to work with me. How do otherwise good people come to hate others so easily?

Richard Nixon, in spite of his dubious character, said it best, “Always remember, others may hate you, but those who hate you don’t win unless you hate them, and then you destroy yourself.”

Dr. Evan S. Levine

170 Lounsbury Rd., Oct. 26