It’s going to get crazier.

That just seems a safe bet. People are working from home. Loved ones are seeing entirely too much of each other. Walks in the woods are starting to seem like reruns of some ill-concieved nature show on the public education network from hell…

Oh, just kidding! Things aren’t really so bad. At least for those of us who are safe at home, with our lives and our loved ones intact.

It’s an opportunity to do something you’ve been meaning to do. Relearn that French you forgot from high school. Clean the garage. Take up painting. Catch up on Gilligan’s Island reruns.

Ridgefield’s First Selectman Rudy Marconi is among more than 100 Ridgefielders — 110 by Tuesday evening’s count — to have tested positive for Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. Or should that be “evil coronavirus” maybe?

Our town leader, Marconi, says he feels like he’s “turned the corner” and is recovering from the disease.

Let us hope so.

He also asks a few simple things of us — many of them the same things other authorities are asking.

Stay at home if at all possible — don’t go out unless it’s absolutely necessary.

If a trip out is required, fashion a homemade mask to wear — and still stay at least six feet away from everyone you cross paths with.

Town authorities are also asking anyone who has gathered with others in a group recently to self-quarantine for 14 days.

In his messages during this crisis, Marconi has more than once asked Ridgefielders to remember those less fortunate. The town has a fund to help people, such as renters in town who may have lost their jobs and can’t pay the rent. Contributions can be sent to: Friends of Ridgefield — Ridgefield Responds, 400 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. And they asked the generous folks who give to be sure to notify employers who sponsor matching contributions.

One of those old but sound bits of wisdom is that there’s nothing that’ll make you feel better about your own life than doing something good for someone else.

So let us not give in to that temptation that seems always to beacon — viewing our own problems as somehow looming larger than they really do.

The president’s hair bugs you? The things that come out of the president’s mouth bug you?

Deal with it. He’s like everybody else, doing the best he can in a tough situation.

Stuck at home all day, every day?

Get a real problem.

Feeling down?

Do something for somebody else.

Just, please, do it from home — make an online contribution to the refugees in Syria, maybe.