A frenzied fashion fiasco's fix from a Ridgefield resident

A frenzied fashion fiasco's fix from a Ridgefield resident

A standard letter image, and graphic that is used on Hearst Connecticut Media online websites, and in Hearst Connecticut Media publications, are shown. The writer of this letter, also writes this letter about what she feels is a solution to a current issue, along with matter.

A standard letter image, and graphic that is used on Hearst Connecticut Media online websites, and in Hearst Connecticut Media publications, are shown. The writer of this letter, also writes this letter about what she feels is a solution to a current issue, along with matter.

Contributed photo

To the Editor,

The fast fashion industry is demolishing our planet. As enthusiastic as I was to hear about The FABRIC Act, I am incredibly disappointed to see that The Ridgefield Press has not given it any attention, especially as a town that is so proactive in working towards solving modern issues. The Fashion Accountability and Building Real Institutional Change Act (FABRIC Act) is an important act that, if passed, will change the course of the fashion industry for the better. It will provide fair pay for garment workers, hold brands accountable for higher work standards, and provide a $40 million domestic garment manufacturing grant program to better the fashion industry. Also, a 30% reshoring tax credit for manufacturers who move operations to the US to avoid admissions from clothing transportation across the world would be implemented. I am asking local senators and representatives of Connecticut to sign The FABRIC Act into action. 
    
Not only would the FABRIC Act save garment workers' lives, but it would benefit the environment. The fashion industry is the second most dangerous to the environment, after the oil industry. Currently, 400% more clothes are being produced compared to 20 years ago and 77 pounds of textiles are wasted annually per person. The Act would reduce these detrimental facts. This would be because when the dedicated people who make our clothes are treated well, not overworked, and get paid sufficiently, the amount of clothing will decrease. The quality of clothes will also become better. As a result, the amount of fast fashion will also be reduced.
    
If we do not get more congress members to support The FABRIC Act, the fashion industry will continue to win in the act of destroying the environment. We need to reduce this impact immediately. 

Sincerely, 

Ariel Langberg 

Skidmore College Student 

Ridgefield resident