We’re talking about scams. Again.

Several years ago, I wrote about a friend’s mother who was almost scammed out of several thousand dollars by a con artist claiming to be her grandson in need of a bailout. In response to a 2012 request from the State Attorney’s Office, I wrote about the increasing number of telemarketing and mass mailing scams that were targeting the elderly, who continue to be among popular targets for scammers.

Why do scammers succeed? “Criminals use today's technology to prey on the emotions of people,” says Ridgefield Police Chief John Roche. The Chief will report on the latest regional scams in a seminar at Founders Hall on Friday, Jan. 27, at 1 p.m.

Sadly, there is much to report. This paper posted more than 15 articles about local scams in the last two years alone.

The variety is astonishing. There have been scams related to travel, taxes, real estate, health care, charities, lotteries, utilities, home repair, tech support and more. Increasingly savvy scammers assume personas ranging from IRS agents to grandchildren to try to separate you from your money. Your best defense is education. Learn from Chief Roche how to identify and avoid internet, phone, banking and general homeowner scams.