RVNAhealth Today: Hope is in the Air

Here is the latest column from the home health care agency RVNAhealth in Ridgefield, Conn. The column is written by RVNAhealth's President and CEO Theresa Santoro, (not pictured). This column is about the concept of hope, the disease COVID-19, the COVID-19 vaccine, and the pandemic from the disease.

Here is the latest column from the home health care agency RVNAhealth in Ridgefield, Conn. The column is written by RVNAhealth's President and CEO Theresa Santoro, (not pictured). This column is about the concept of hope, the disease COVID-19, the COVID-19 vaccine, and the pandemic from the disease.

Contributed photo

For those fortunate enough to have received their COVID-19 vaccination, you know that the vaccine comes with a refrain of reminders. Continue wearing a mask, maintain physical distance, keep washing those hands. There are several unknowns regarding the vaccine, including longevity of immunization, effectiveness against variants and protection against contracting COVID-19, and transmitting it to others, hence the directive to stay committed to behaviors we’ve become quite familiar with in the past year.

On March 8, offering a glimpse of optimism, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also released “Interim Guidance for the Fully Vaccinated,”, which outlines things the “fully vaccinated” can and can’t do. The guidance is expected to evolve and expand based on the proportion of the population that is fully vaccinated and the rapidly evolving science on COVID-19 vaccines.

By CDC definition, one is “fully vaccinated” two or more weeks after receiving their second dose of the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines, or two or more weeks following their single-dose Johnson & Johnson, or Janssen, vaccine. Now a full year after the official declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic by the World Health Organization (March 11, 2020), having some treasured activities return to the “can do” list is certainly a welcome treat.

Here are the highlights:

- Fully vaccinated people may visit with other fully vaccinated people indoors without wearing masks, or physical distancing.

- Fully vaccinated people may visit with unvaccinated people from a single household who are at low risk for severe COVID-19 disease indoors without wearing masks, or physical distancing. Be certain your unvaccinated friends, and family are low risk before acting on this one.

- And fully vaccinated people may refrain from quarantine and testing following a known exposure if asymptomatic.