Founders Hall offers program for residents, retired, working

Pictured is the Founders Hall logo. The communications manager at the donor-supported center for lifelong learning fitness, and fun in Ridgefield writes this column about the programs that the center has available for residents of the town, age 60, and older, who are retired, and working.

Pictured is the Founders Hall logo. The communications manager at the donor-supported center for lifelong learning fitness, and fun in Ridgefield writes this column about the programs that the center has available for residents of the town, age 60, and older, who are retired, and working.

Contributed photo

Retiring is one of the most significant and psychologically complex life transitions a person makes. Ideally, we would spend years preparing for it, both financially and emotionally.

Unfortunately, adjusting to retirement is difficult for many people, according to marketwatch.com. They experience boredom, anxiety, restlessness and feelings of uselessness. In fact, retired men were found to be 40 percent more likely than employed men to experience depression.

Many people visualize retirement as time of liberation and freedom, but report missing the social connections, stimulation and structure that work provides. So what to do? Develop new social connections, perhaps by joining a club, volunteering or taking classes.

Part-time work can provide interaction, stimulation and structure — hopefully without the stress of a demanding career.

Stay physically active, ideally doing something you love, which will protect your health. Experts also advise viewing retirement as a long stage with different phases.

The first year may be a honeymoon period, followed by reorientation and settling in, which is when many people begin to think about what they have to offer the world.

Founders Hall offers a wide variety of programs for people 60 and older, both retired and working. Ridgefield residents can join at any time. Visit founders-hall.org for more information.