Election 2017: Town unveils final results, outcomes

Town Clerk Barbara Serfilippi, middle, discusses this year’s election results at a special meeting Monday afternoon in Town Hall.

Democrats 17, Republicans eight — that was tally of board and commission seats gained in this year’s unusually confusing election.

“We wanted to be sure we got it right,” Town Clerk Barbara Serfilippi said Monday afternoon, explaining why it took almost a week for final results of all the election contests to be announced.

Serfilippi, Republican Registrar of Voters Hope Wise and Democratic Registrar of Voters Cindy Bruno sat before a gathering of about a dozen candidates and interested members of the public — town committee chairmen, party activists, the press, other town officials — to announce and explain the final results of the Nov. 7 election.

Here’s a quick run-down.

Finance board

For Board of Finance, two separate races resulted in the election of three new members: Democrats Sean Connelly and Amy Macartney Freidenrich, and Republican Dick Moccia.

In last Tuesday’s ‘blue wave,’ Democrats Connelly and Freidenrich outpolled Republicans Michael Raduazzo and Marty Heiser in a four-way contest for two full four-year seats.

And in a separate race for a two-year vacancy, Freidenrich outpolled Republican Dick Moccia.

But a person, no matter how many votes they get, cannot hold two separate seats on the same board.

Having won the two distinct seats, Freidenrich has said she’ll keep the four-year term and resign the two-year seat, which then passes to Moccia as the second-highest vote getter.

School board

For Board of Education, Democrats won five seat and Republicans one.

Four Democrats — Doug Silver, Margaret Stamatis, Kathleen Holz and Carina Borgia-Drake, were elected  to full year terms, defeating Republicans David Cordisco, Kaitlyn Hayes and Scott Preston in a seven-way race for the four seats.

There were also two separate positions to fill two-year vacancies on the ballot, running unopposed, Republican Sharon D’Orso won one of the two-year school board seats, and Democrat Carina Borgia-Drake — who also won a four-year seat — won the other.

Borgia-Drake will have to resign one of the two seats she won, and informed election officials she will keep the four-year seat and resign the two-year seat.

Because she was unopposed for the two-year seat, the vacancy created by her resignation will be filled by a vote of the school board, but it must go to a Democrat since the voters chose a Democrat, Borgia-Drake, to fill it.

Traditionally, though it is not required, the school board would seek a recommendation from the Democratic Town Committee on filling the Democratic vacancy.

Planning and Zoning

For the Planning and Zoning Commission, three Democrats and three Republicans were elected as a result of last Tuseday’s voting. The Democrats are Charles Robbins, Joe Dowdell and Joe Fossi. The Republicans are George Hanlon, Rebecca Mucchetti and Bob Cascella.

In this case, there were two contests, one for five full four-year commission seats, and another to fill out two-year vacancy.

In a six-way race for the five full-term seats, Democrats Charles Robbins, Joe Dowdell and Joe Fossi outpolled all three Republicans — George Hanlon, Rebecca Mucchetti and Stephen Cole, and a write-in candidate, Bob Cousins.

The five full-term seats when to the five high vote-getters: Robbins, Dowdell, Fossi, Mucchetti and Hanlon.

For the two-year vacancy, Democrat Charles Robbins was on the ballot again, and outpolled Republican Bob Cascella. But having won a four-year seat, Robbins will resign from the two-year seat, which then goes to Cascella.

Zoning Board of Appeals

For Zoning Board of Appeals, there were five seats to fill, two full five-year terms, a one-year vacancy, and two different terms for ZBA alternates.

Democrat Mark Seavy, with an expiring term as an alternate, was on the ballot for four of the five positions.

Here’s how the results break out:

For a full five-year ZBA term that begins this November, Democrat Terry Bearden-Rettger defeated incumbent Republican Carson Fincham, and will take the seat.

For a full five-year ZBA term beginning in 2018, Democrat Mark Seavy defeated Republican incumbent David Choplinski, and will fill the seat.

Seavy also won, unopposed, a one-year vacancy on the ZBA, which he can fill out since it expires in November 2018 when the full five-year seat he won, defeating Choplinski, is due to begin.

Seavy also ran for two vacancy positions as ZBA alternates.

For a two-year ZBA alternate’s position, Seavy ran head-to-head against Republican John McNicholas, who will take the seat when Seavy resigns.

For a three-year ZBA alternate’s vacancy, Seavy was unopposed. He will resign and the seat, which will then be filled — with another Democrat — by the charter process (vote of other board members).

On Police Commission, victors were Democrat Stephen Saloom and Republicans Marcie Coffin and Joseph Savino, with Democrat Arnold DiLaura and Republican incumbent Thomas Reynolds edged out.

On Board of Assessment Appeals, winners were Democrats Anne Cutter and Jeff Lundberg, with Republican incumbent Robert Jewell losing a seat,.

 

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