Menu 

Stitching love into scarves

“Once word got out, primarily through social media, people began coming into my shop looking for green and white yarn,” said Nancy O’Connell.

Nancy O, the shop on Catoonah Street, has been part of an effort that is providing hundeds of green-and-white scarves for families in Newtown.

The day after the shooting in Sandy Hook, a mom from Monroe knitted a green-and-white scarf to comfort a friend’s child who attends the Sandy Hook school.

The woman, Jeanne Malgioglio, then decided to collect hand-knit scarves for the children and families of the school that was struck.

“Once word got out, primarily through social media, people began coming into my shop looking for green and white yarn,” said Nancy O’Connell.

Green and white are the colors of the Sandy Hook schools.

“On the Wednesday after the shooting, I called my yarn supplier, who rushed a huge box of about 200 balls of green and white yarn to me, at a discount which I passed on to my customers. The yarn arrived on Friday at noon, and in the midst of people shopping for holiday gifts, I found knitters lined up to get the yarn.”

Within just a few hours, nancy O had run out of green and white yarn again. On the Monday after Christmas, Ms. O’Connell ordered more yarn, which has also been just about depleted.

“Since we offered to deliver them, the completed scarves are being returned to nancy O,” she said. “I can safely estimate that we have at least 200 scarves in house already, and they will continue to be collected throughout the weekend, then delivered to Jeanne Malgioglio in Monroe on Monday.”

The scarves have been knit and crocheted by people both young and old.

“A young woman with a friend who lost a child that day brought in 20 scarves that her 90-year-old grandmother had crocheted,” Ms. O’Connell said.

The scarves continue to arrive, both hand-delivered and through the mail from as far away as Canada, Rhode Island, and Vermont, as well as throughout the Ridgefield area.

“Many are accompanied by letters and prayers, as well as tokens of faith and love that are actually stitched into them,” Ms. O’Connell said.

“Since we all have felt helpless since the tragedy, this has been a way for people to feel they can do something for the people of Sandy Hook.”

About author

By participating in the comments section of this site you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and User Agreement

© Hersam Acorn. All rights reserved. The Ridgefield Press, 16 Bailey Avenue, Ridgefield, CT 06877

Designed by WPSHOWER

Powered by WordPress